Diabetes Association Says ‘Eat Well, America!’

Throughout November, the focus is on diabetes, and this year the American Diabetes Association joined with the International Diabetes Federation, an umbrella organization of over 230 national diabetes associations in 170 countries and territories, to increase  awareness of the disease and offer ways to avoid or manage it.

November, after all, is American Diabetes Month and Nov. 14 is World Diabetes Day, chosen to mark the birthday of Sir Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin.

“Diabetes is a serious epidemic facing not only our nation, but the world,” said Dr. David Marrero, President of Health Care & Education for the American Diabetes Association (ADA), in a press release. Diabetes is estimated to affect 387 million individuals worldwide. In the United States, almost 30 million people are thought to have diabetes, and 86 million to be prediabetic.

The World Diabetes Day 2015 initiative called attention to the year-round importance of healthy eating habits in preventing or managing diabetes in order to avoid disease-related complications.

“We can make progress in the fight to Stop Diabetes® by helping people with healthy ideas they can put into action, including resources to help people make the right choice when it comes to what they eat,” said Dr. Marrero.

The American Diabetes Association’s campaign for this month is Eat Well, America!, and its goal is to help make healthy eating habits a key and accessible option for those with diabetes and obesity-related illnesses. The campaign includes tips on easy ways to plan meals and tasty new recipes every week.

As part of the initiative, five nationally known chefs and cookbook authors — Aviva Goldfarb, Barbara Seelig-Brown, Ingrid Hoffman, Jackie Newgent and Ronaldo Linares — worked with the ADA  to come up with a number of healthy recipes of appeal to anyone wanting to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

For more information on the Eat Well, America! campaign and to get recipes and cooking tips, click on this link, or call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383).

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